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Designing interventions to achieve impact

Student Blogger for Global Nutrition Council at ASN’s Scientific Sessions and Annual Meeting at EB 2016

By: Sheela Sinharoy, MPH

A symposium titled Program Effectiveness for Addressing Undernutrition during the First 1,000 Days provided attendees with examples of programs in Bangladesh, Guatemala, and Burundi.

In Bangladesh, the Rang-Din Nutrition Study tested lipid-based nutrient supplements (LNS) in a community-based program. According to presenter Kay Dewey, the study found that giving LNS to mothers prenatally reduced the prevalence of stunting and increased the birth weight, head circumference, and body mass index (BMI) in infants at birth. LNS and multiple micronutrient powders (MNP) for children were also associated with better developmental and cognitive outcomes. Dr. Dewey noted that the impact on child anthropometry was much larger in food insecure households, so future programs may want to target based on this and other criteria.

Moving from Asia to Africa, Marie Ruel presented results from an impact evaluation of a food-assisted integrated health and nutrition program in Burundi. The program gave food rations to mothers and children and also provided behavior change communication. Interestingly, the nutrition situation in Burundi deteriorated sharply during the program period, but decreases were less severe in the treatment groups. For example, while the prevalence of stunting increased dramatically in the control group, the prevalence in the treatment group remained essentially flat. Thus, although the treatment group did not improve, the results suggest that the intervention protected families who otherwise would have been vulnerable to economic shocks.

Guatemala is another country with a very high prevalence of chronic undernutrition, and Deanna Olney presented results from a study of a similar food assistance program. The impact of the program was greatest among those who received a full family food ration plus an individual ration of corn-soy blend. In these households, mothers had significantly higher mean BMIs, children had a lower prevalence of stunting, and both mothers and children had a lower prevalence of anemia. However, there were no significant impacts on child underweight, wasting, or language or motor development.

The differing impacts of various programs was the impetus for a talk by Per Ashorn, who discussed pathways of impact for fetal growth, linear growth, and cognitive function. He explained that the pathways for linear, ponderal, and head growth are partially different, and there are possibly partially different pathways to childhood length gain and brain function. This suggests a need for multipronged interventions targeting pathways including infection, nutrition, and inflammation, as well as a variety of outcome measures to assess the interventions’ impact.

Of course, cost is an important – and often challenging – issue when planning interventions. The final talk of the symposium was given by Steve Vosti, who explained that programs must balance need, acceptability, use, and both short-term and persistent demand in order to achieve impact. These and many other factors, such as the costs of manufacturing supplements in country and the proportion of locally available ingredients being used, can affect the cost of an intervention. In addition to deciding on the most appropriate intervention to meet a need, practitioners must take these factors into account when planning their programs.

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Moving toward a holistic model of woman-centered antenatal care

By: Sheela Sinharoy, MPH

Sunday began with a symposium titled, Delivering Nutrition Interventions to Women during Pregnancy: Beyond Individual Interventions to Comprehensive Antenatal Guidelines and Care. A series of speakers made clear that as antenatal care (ANC) models continue to evolve, there is plenty of room for improvement to provide a positive pregnancy experience for women and their families.

ANC is not meeting its potential. This was the conclusion of the first speaker, Erica Phillips. She discussed the model of focused ANC (FANC) recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO), which involves 75-80 tasks for an intake visit and 60-65 tasks for each follow-up. She explained that following these recommendations would require an estimated 30-40 minutes for a first visit and 20 minutes for a follow-up. Even when recommended tasks are completed, quality of care may still be low. Ms. Phillips stated that “where FANC has been adopted, success has been limited.”

Still, ANC can be an effective platform for breastfeeding promotion, according to the next speaker, Mduduzi Mbuya. He presented a case study from the Sanitation, Hygiene, Infant Nutrition Efficacy (SHINE) trial in Zimbabwe. The country faces a critical shortage of health workers, with only 9.8 skilled health workers per 10,000 people (as compared to a ratio of 117:10,000 in the USA). SHINE therefore engaged community-based village health workers and found that the prevalence of exclusive breastfeeding at six months of age increased from 23% to 68%. Dr. Mbuya attributed this result primarily to strong fidelity of implementation by village health workers.

Micronutrient supplementation is another important component of ANC, and Kate Dickin spoke about a trial of calcium supplementation in Kenya and Ethiopia. There, researchers found that women were motivated and willing to take calcium supplements as recommended and that most women sustained their adherence to the supplements through the six-week study period and said they would continue through the end of their pregnancies. Dr. Dickin attributed this largely to the intervention’s behavior change communication strategy, which was based on extensive formative research and addressed context-specific motivators and barriers.

Next, Catharine Taylor spoke about the way forward and the need for integrated, women-centered models of care. She said that ANC models should take the local context into account; have all goods and personnel in same physical space; provide clear and consistent guidelines, training and supervision to health workers; provide demonstrations and encourage active engagement and discussion; provide incentives and support; and implement women-held records and integrated health registers. As examples, she described the Centering Pregnancy model and women’s support groups, which have shown promise in a number of developing country settings.

Finally, Rebecca Stoltzfus closed the session, emphasizing the need for more community-based evidence, especially looking at “packages of ANC that are contextually adapted to be delivered in the most effective ways.” Thus, symposium attendees walked away with a substantial research agenda for the strengthening of antenatal guidelines and care.

 

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Multiple Micronutrients Offer Multiple Possibilities for Pregnant Women and Newborns

By Marion L. Roche, PhD, Micronutrient Initiative

An estimated 42% of pregnant women are anemic. Anaemia in pregnancy is associated with increased mortality for mothers and infants, low birth weight in infants and increased risk of premature delivery. Iron Folic Acid (IFA) supplementation is recommended where anaemia is a public health concern. Many in the global nutrition research community have been anxiously awaiting the JiVitA-3 Randomized Trial in Bangladesh. This study has been looking at the comparative effectiveness of iron folic acid (IFA) supplements vs. multiple micronutrient supplements for pregnant women and one month postpartum.

This recent research in Bangladesh, which shows potential to reduce preterm births and low birth weight, holds promise for contributing to global reductions in neonatal mortality, although reductions in infant mortality were not found to be significant in this study. Low birth weight puts infants at risk of neonatal mortality and developmental consequences later in life. The risks of neonatal deaths for preemies and the critical importance of addressing preterm births has gained increasing recognition through the “Born too Soon” Global Action Report.

These results are exciting and will be balanced with the costs of transitioning from IFA to multiple micronutrients as countries decide how, when, and if to transition to “multis.” For many countries, the multiple micronutrients will be an added cost, and will come with substantial implications for procurement and supply management. They will also be a new product for many of the physicians, nurses, health workers and family members that have a role of supporting and encouraging pregnant women, and most importantly for pregnant women themselves.

Multiple micronutrient supplements will only have benefits if pregnant women have access to the supplements, receive them early enough in pregnancy to consume the recommended dose, and be supported, motivated and encouraged to consume the supplements daily. Global experiences with IFA supplementation would suggest that adherence has been one of the greatest challenges to behaviour change. Supporting adherence requires a reliable supply, encouraging counseling for pregnant women and improving a women’s access to IFA and related ante natal care services.

Nepal’s national iron intensification project is an example of a project that, for over eight years, was able to increase iron coverage from 23% to 80% and increase adherence of 90 tablets from 6% to 56%. This was largely achieved through the integration of a community based delivery system of female community health volunteers (FCHVs) who delivered the IFA supplements to women in their community and also encouraged them and restocked their IFA supply when needed. The FCHVs also received participatory training and provided practical advice on how to support and encourage women. Additional strategies will be needed to further increase adherence and maintain the motivation of the FCHVs.

As the global nutrition community reflects on the implications of the evidence from this new study, they will also be looking to learn from IFA programs and the successes and challenges. Whether IFA or multis are selected as part of the strategy for anemia reduction and improving maternal and newborn health, innovative approaches and replication of best practices and promising strategies for increasing adherence and coverage are needed to reduce maternal anaemia and benefit infants.